• Dina Reminick, LPCC

    I have been in the mental health field for over two decades, and my career as a therapist has led me through a variety of different settings, from mental health clinics to therapeutic foster care, hospital settings, children’s residential treatment, and even the insurance side of the process! My main clientele has been school-aged children and adolescents and their families, but as a trauma trained therapist, I work with all ages. I have gained invaluable perspective through each patient’s narrative and coping mechanisms for stress and trauma to learn what books and courses cannot teach.

    The mind and the body are inextricably interwoven. I believe in the importance of sharing knowledge about the mind-body relationship of trauma, panic, anxiety, and depression, so client and therapist become an informed team. I do not see the therapist’s role as an expert, but rather a guide to help my clients understand what they have been experiencing and why, how it may have influenced their interactions with their world, and how to move forward. Relief begins with knowledge and understanding of one’s internal experiences. With that in mind, it is possible to heal without revisiting uncomfortable memories, or even having concrete memories at all.

    My clinical interests include trauma, anxiety and panic, and transitional stress, whether that be exploring or revealing sexuality and/or gender identity, developmental transitions, managing increasing expectations of early adulthood, or navigating life changes. I am extensively trained in EMDR, TF-CBT (Trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy), child-centered play therapy, and filial family therapy. Other evidence-based approaches of interest include ERP (exposure and response prevention), Internal family systems, and ART (accelerated resolution therapy).

    Outside of my profession, I volunteer with animals, desperately try to get my teenagers to clean up after themselves, and foster dogs. You may get to meet some of them (dogs, not my kids) if they are the therapy-type, as the presence of a dog can have a powerful comforting effect.